Worry About Real Crimes, Not Sagging Pants

Baggy Pants

Ana Kasparian wonders how sagging pants are more detrimental to American society than people who perpetuate real violence:

While it’s true that it’s irritating to see some teen’s colorful boxer briefs while his pants are nearly down to his ankles, the hyper-sexualized mass media we both willingly and unwillingly consume on a daily basis makes the questionable attire seem tame.

Juxtapose the saggy pants story to a viral video from Alaskathat features a group of teenage girls beating their friend viciously at a sleepover. The ten minute video of Naomi Johnson getting attacked was so brutal that her parents pulled her out of school and filed a civil suit against the mother who hosted the slumber party.

As of now, the four girls who viciously kicked, punched, and dragged Johnson are not facing any criminal charges. The school the attackers go to has also neglected to take any action.

Click on the story to read more about that disturbing Alaskan beating story. An investigation is continuing, but Kasparian’s point is a valid one. While a slow investigative process in Alaska lurches-on, states like Tennessee have harsher and swifter penalties for people exposing their boxers than we do for real violent criminals.

Here’s the money quote:

Both stories come from two different parts of the country, but it does go to show you where our priorities are. Certain behavior tends to get a pass when they’re perpetrated by innocent looking girls. At the same time, we allow preconceived notions and stereotypes to cloud our judgement when we see minority students dressed a certain way. It’s interesting that saggy pants make people uncomfortable because they symbolize violent gang behavior, and the teens who actually carried out an act of violence were dressed in bedazzled jeans. Looks can be deceiving.

It’s also a generational bias. I find it that baby boomers and Gen-Xers are outraged by sagging jeans, which is strange in that mini-skirts were huge in the 60’s and baggy shirts and jeans were “the thing” in the 90’s. Different times. Different fashions. Each angered the older generations. (For the record, I don’t get the baggy pants fashion statement, but to each their own.)

But Kasparian nails it when she says policing dress codes is easier than stopping bullying.

pat@wsgw.com

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