The “Fab Five” Should Fade Away

So says Mick McCabe from The Detroit Free Press:

FabFive

We did not need these five guys showing up and attempting to hijack the Final Four. If they wanted a reunion they should have done it in a private room at a restaurant, not on national TV.

 

The festivities in Atlanta were not about the Fab Five. They should have been about Trey Burke, the national player of the year; Mitch McGary, the freshman who dominated through most of the tournament; and some little guy named Spike Albrecht, who captured the imagination of the national television audience.

 

For Jalen Rose to plead on a national stage for disgraced Chris Webber to attend Monday night’s championship game was despicable. And CBS and the rest of the media fell for it hook, line and sinker.

I’m honestly baffled as to exactly why some people are celebrating this group.  They were fun and entertaining to watch, but they lost, and more importantly, they helped cause Michigan’s exodus from competitive basketball for nearly two decades.

They always loved the spotlight, and they made sure to again put themselves in the middle of the action.

McCabe is correct: Monday night was a night to celebrate the current team.  Trey Burke, Mitch McGary, Glenn Robinson III, and even Spike Albrecht should’ve been the main stories.  The Fab Five didn’t want to allow that to happen.  Jalen Rose, in particular, spent even more time on ESPN lobbying for the Fab Five to receive their so-called rightful recognition by having their own banner hanging in the Crisler Center.

What a joke!

McCabe reminds us why that should never be allowed to happen:

Who cared whether (Chris) Webber attended the game?

 

He was the main character in one of college basketball’s most nefarious scandals, accepting more than $200,000 from late booster Ed Martin, which landed U-M on probation, forced U-M to erase all evidence that the Fab Five era existed and caused the NCAA to order U-M to disassociate itself from Webber for 10 years. Webber was indicted on perjury charges for lying to a grand jury; Martin was charged with laundering money from a gambling ring he ran at Detroit-area auto plants. When Martin died before there could be a trial, Webber pleaded guilty to criminal contempt, admitting in court that he had been paying back Martin.

Everyone seems to have forgotten those lurid, little details about the Fab Five.

And yet, they want to be rewarded?!?!?  For what?

The Fab Five wants the story to be all about them.  Sadly, many Michigan alums, students, and fans younger than me, probably don’t remember the 1989 championship team–a team that contained the greatest Michigan player I’ve ever watched, Glenn Rice.

We didn’t hear a whole lot about Rice.  All we heard about was about a group of guys who won ZERO championships.

ZERO.

I second McCabe’s motion: Fab Five, go away…for good.

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